SMSC & British Values

SMSC and British Values at Moorbridge

 

SMSC

At Moorbridge we believe the following is  a definition of what is believed to be Spiritual, Moral, Social & Cultural Development.

Spiritual Development

Personal development relating to the spirit or soul and the intangible. N.B. It does not relate to physical nature or matter and is not synonymous with religious education – although religious education can be a major vehicle for the delivery of spiritual matters.

Moral Development

Personal development relating to human behaviour, especially the distinction between good and bad or right and wrong.

Social Development

Personal development concerned with living in a community rather than alone.

Cultural Development

Personal development concerned with the total of inherited ideas, beliefs, values and knowledge which constitute the shared basis for social action.

 

An audit was taken, with different subjects at Moorbridge indicating how each subject makes a distinct and particular contribution to SMSC.

We also have SMSC/PSE/Enrichment  as a specific activity session on the timetable where a variety of issues are looked at depending on the nature of the pupils at anyone given time and issues in society as well as ensuring basic topics such as Religion, Festivals, Tough Issues, Social Problems etc are covered.

It is important to note that other policies directly influence, support and promote SMSC. e.g. our  Behaviour Policy and Equal Opportunities  show that these policies form an integral part of daily classroom practice at Moorbridge.

Apart from specific subjects it is clear that our Personal & Social Education (PSE) programme contributes substantially to the promotion of SMSC awareness within school, as well as the SMSC specific activity session led by our Learning Mentors.

Within the Curriculum SMSC is extremely important:

English/Literacy/Reading 

Makes a major contribution to pupils’ SMSC development through:

• Developing confidence and expertise in language, which is an important aspect of individual and social identity;

• Enabling pupils to understand and engage with the feelings and values embodied in high quality poetry, fiction, and media

• Developing pupils’ awareness of moral and social issues in fiction, journalism, magazines, radio, television and film;

• Helping pupils to understand how language changes over time, the influences on spoken, and written language and social attitudes to the use of language.

 


Mathematics/Numeracy/Challenge

Can provide a contribution to pupils’ SMSC by:

• Supporting whole school policy on issues such as discipline and behaviour.

• Enabling pupils to acknowledge the important contribution made by mathematicians to society.

 

Science

Provides opportunities for pupils’ SMSC development through examples such as:

• Encouraging pupils to reflect on the wonder of the natural world;

• Awareness of the ways that science and technology can affect society and the environment.

• Consideration of the moral dilemmas that can result in scientific developments.

• Showing respect for differing opinions, on creation for example.

• Co-operation in practical activity.

• Raising awareness that scientific developments are the product of many different cultures.

 

ICT

Can contribute to SMSC development by:

• Making clear the guidelines about the ethical use of the internet and other forms of communications technology.

• Acknowledging advances in technology and appreciation for human achievement.

 

Humanities (Geography/History)

Makes a contribution to SMSC by:

• Looking at the establishment of multi-cultural Britain.

• Enabling pupils to reflect on issues such as slavery, the holocaust and War

• Showing an awareness of the moral implications of the actions of historical figures.

• Awareness of the moral dilemmas created by technological advances, the impact

of ‘winners & losers’ ethos.

• How different cultures have contributed to technology.

• Opportunities for reflection on the creation, earth’s origins, future and diversity are given.

• Reflection on the fair distribution of the earth’s resources.

• Studies of people and places gives pupils the chance to reflect on the social and cultural characteristics of society.

 

PE/Alternative Education/Activities

Pupils’ SMSC development is actively promoted  by:

• Activities involving co-operation, teamwork, competition, rules, self-discipline and fair play.

• Exploring the sports and traditions of a variety of cultures.

• Individual activities that provide the opportunity for self-reflection, awareness and challenge.

 


British Values

 

At Moorbridge  we promote ‘British Values’ through our spiritual, moral, social and cultural education which permeates through the school’s curriculum and supports the development of the ‘whole child’.

 

We recognise that such development is most successful when those values and attitudes are promoted by all the staff and provide a model of behaviour for our pupils.

 

The curriculum in all phases (KS3 &KS4) offers broad and balanced opportunities.

 

We want our pupils to become responsible, active citizens who participate in democracy and public life with respect for diversity and a commitment to working towards greater community cohesion.

Personal, Social, Health Education and Citizenship (PSHE&C) is at the heart of our school which emphasises the difference between right and wrong and respecting & tolerating differences in a very diverse and modern Britain. We have planned a curriculum that will enable pupils to make progress towards these aims. Through engaging lessons using our learning model and appropriate activities, we can give them all a better understanding of themselves and others in the ‘community of communities’ in which they live. We can secure and influence  Social and Emotional Well Being, behaviour and attendance and encourage further involvement and commitment to education now and in the future.

 

 

 

 

 SMSC & British Values and related School values

 

 

 Examples of how these are developed in the school and wider curriculum

SMSC - Spiritual Development

 

Personal development relating to the spirit or soul and the intangible. N.B. It does not relate to physical nature or matter and is not synonymous with religious education – although religious education can be a major vehicle for the delivery of spiritual matters.

 

Give pupils the opportunity to explore values and beliefs, including religious beliefs and the way in which they affect peoples’ lives.

        Give pupils the opportunity to understand human feelings and emotions, the way they affect people and how an understanding of them can be helpful.

        Encourage pupils to relate their learning to a wider frame of reference- for example, asking ‘why?’ ‘how?’ and ‘where?’ as well as ‘what?’.

        Explored in detail in our ’enrichment programme’ lunchtimes and break times where pupils debate, discuss and explore local or national issues.

 

SMSC - Moral Development

 

Personal development relating to human behaviour, especially the distinction between good and bad or right and wrong.

 

Provide a clear moral code as a basis for behaviour which is promoted consistently through all aspects of the school.

• Promote measures to prevent discrimination on the basis of race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, age and other criteria.

• Encourage pupils to take responsibility for their actions; for example, respect for property, care of the environment, and becoming responsible for their own behaviour.

• Provide models of moral virtue through literature, humanities, sciences, arts, assemblies.

 

 

SMSC - Social Development

 

Personal development concerned with living in a community rather than alone.

 

Foster a sense of community, with common, inclusive values which ensure that everyone, irrespective of ethnic origin, nationality, gender, ability, sexual orientation and religion can flourish.

        Help pupils develop personal qualities which are valued in a civilised society, for example, thoughtfulness, honesty, respect for difference, moral principles, independence, interdependence, self-respect.

        Provide a conceptual and linguistic framework within which to understand and debate social issues.

        Work together co-operatively

  • Creative Arts Programme  - social development addressed through creative arts options where team work and social interactions are key in developing competency.  In Creative Arts Physical this is addressed through paired work, small group work and a larger team environment which all encourage social interaction and development
  • The Dallagilo Foundation and NUFC Football Foundation have also explained social development through the organisation and participation in regional and national competitions

SMSC - Cultural Development

 

Personal development concerned with the total of inherited ideas, beliefs, values and knowledge which constitute the shared basis for social action.

 

Provide opportunities for pupils to explore their own cultural assumptions and values.

• Present authentic accounts of the attitudes, values and traditions of diverse cultures.

• Extend pupils’ knowledge and use of cultural imagery and language. Recognising and nurturing particular gifts and talents.

• Provide opportunities for pupils to participate in literature, music and art, crafts and other cultural events and encouraging pupils to reflect on their significance.

 

 

 BV - Democracy

 

 To understand and respect the democratic process :

 

  • To understand how they can influence decision making through a democratic process
  • To understand how to argue and defend a point of view
  • To understand the importance of team work

 

The ability to understand and communicate are the most important areas of

learning. We ensure that pupils are given a ‘voice’ to communicate. This

‘voice’ could be using words, objects, photographs, pictures, symbols, touch

cues, eye pointing or body language.

 

We empower our pupils by giving them opportunities to make choices about

the things that they believe to be important. By valuing each ‘voice’ and by

listening and responding to that voice we demonstrate that we support

democracy and liberty.

 

 

  • Cross Curricular Project on Political Parties
  • Cross Curricular Political Party Invention, policies and presentation
  • Annual pupil survey
  • focus groups and class discussions to encourage students to make decisions about school life.
  • At the beginning of each topic, children are asked ‘What do I know already and what do I want to learn?’  - pupils are also asked to be reflective throughout the topic
  • Pupils and staff discuss and decide how to be effective learners together / how to create a positive learning environment for one another.
  • Pupils contribute as a whole class  rules, in addition to the school rules
  • School vote on the name of the new intervention room – name chosen Reflection

 

 

 Moral strand of our PSHE&C curriculum:

1. Begin to exercise choice and the right to decide

2. Begin to discuss and debate topical issues in both small and larger groups

3. Begin to contribute to the life of the class & school; e.g. classroom, corridors, Shiremoor Centre

4. Become aware of and respect the different opinions of others

5. Offer simple ideas or opinions about real school issues.

6. Be confident to try new activities, initiate ideas and speak in a familiar group.

7. Consider the consequences of their words and actions for others.

 

P.E and school sport/Extended School/Dallagilo Foundation:

 

1. Team games taught for striking & fielding, net and invasion games

2. Team games and working with others developed at Social and Emotional Development Time- linked to P.E. lessons /Extended School/Dallagilo Foundation:

3. Athletics/Games

4. A range of extra-curricular activities

 

 

 

 

 

BV - The rule of law

Ability to recognise the difference between right & wrong and apply this to their own lives

  • Ability to accept responsibility for their behaviour
  • To understand the consequences of their behaviour and actions
  • Ability to resolve conflicts effectively
  • Understand how they can contribute positively to the lives of those living and working in the locality and society more widely
  • To understand that living under the rule of law protects them and is essential for their well-being and safety

 

  • KS  assemblies focus upon the School’s Rules /Rewards Programme
  • Points System used in all classrooms to manage learning behaviours
  • Yearly police talks / emergency services visits
  • Star of the week /Student of the week/Friday Rewards
  • Classroom rules
  • Circle time discussions in PSHE/Key Teacher Time
  • Individual behaviour/management plans
  • Restorative Justice at the Heart of Behaviour Management Practices at Moorbridge

 

Moral strand of our PSHE&C curriculum:

 

1. Begin to manage their feelings in a positive way

2. Understand how rules help them; e.g. Rewards System, classroom learning rules

3. Agree and follow rules for their groups and classroom

4. Begin to respect property- personal and public

5. Begin to recognise the difference between right and wrong

6. Begin to understand behaviours which are helpful and unhelpful to make all children feel safe and happy

7. B4L/Begin to set personal goals/Target Setting and weekly reflection with Behaviour Manager to help to learn to manage Behaviour

8. Begin to understand the roles of others in society e.g. people in our local community/people who help us. – regular Police Visits/Social Workers

 

BV - Individual liberty

To understand rights & responsibilities

 

 

  • Points System used in all classrooms to manage learning behaviours
  • Circle time discussions
  • Classroom rules
  • School’s Rules

 

 

Citizenship strand of PSHE&C curriculum:

 

  • B4L/Begin to develop a sense of responsibility and set a personal target.
  • Offer simple ideas or opinions about real school issues.
  • Begin to understand the rights and responsibilities of children.
  • Have a developing awareness of their own needs, views and feelings and be sensitive to the needs, views and feelings of others.
  • Consider the consequences of their words and actions for others.
  • Begin to know about different groups they belong to and the important people and roles within them.

 

 

BV - Mutual respect

&

Tolerance of those with different faiths and belief

 

Reflective about their own beliefs, religious or otherwise that inform their interest in and respect for different people’s faiths, feelings and values

  • Reflective about their own experiences
  • Interest in investigating and offering reasoned views about moral and ethical issues and being able to understand and appreciate the viewpoints of others
  • Use a range of social skills in different contexts, including working and socialising with pupils from different religions, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds

 

  • Participate in a variety of communities and social settings, cooperating well with others
  • Understanding and

 

A range of different resources are used to support the entire curriculum to help pupils understand and welcome diversity

  • Signs around the school in other languages (classrooms and communal areas - Numbers)
  • Visits from Religious Leaders
  • Work with Diverse groups of people eg  Iman discussion with pupils and then worked with pupils to complete a meal for the Whole School
  • School’s Rules
  • Points and Rewards system used in all classrooms to manage learning behaviours 
  • Equality action plan-updated annually
  • Children working in all curriculum areas in different groupings
  • Diversity within the school personnel
  • Monitoring of bullying and prejudiced based incidents by type
  • Participation of community based activities; i.e. Working with NTDF for Charity Fundraising, sharing facilities with NTDF, Breast Cancer Awareness Fund Raising, Cross Curricular Days
  • Christmas and Easter Celebrations
  • Restorative Practice Meetings and conversations

 

Moral strand of our PSHE&C curriculum:

  • Identify and respect similarities and differences between people including physical appearance, culture, family, religion and language
  • Begin to know what bullying is, that there are different types of teasing and bullying and that bullying is hurtful and wrong
  • Learn how to respond appropriately to bullying
  • Respond positively to the diversity and similarity of individuals and groups, including questioning stereotypes
  • Have a positive self-image and show that they are comfortable with themselves.
  • Have a developing awareness of their own needs, views and feelings and be sensitive to the needs, views and feelings of others.
  • appreciation of the range of different cultures within school and further afield as an essential element of their preparation for life in modern Britain
  • Understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity as shown by their tolerance and attitudes pupils sharing experiences of different festivals
  •  To understand beliefs and teachings
  • To understand practices and lifestyles
  • To understand how beliefs are conveyed
  • To explore family routines and customs
  •  To reflect
  • To understand values
  • To talk about similarities and differences between families, communities and traditions

 

French curriculum:

1. To understand the French culture

2. To know the similarities and differences between themselves and others and among families, communities and traditions

 

History curriculum:

1. To investigate and interpret the past

2. To build an overview of world history

 

Geography curriculum:

1. To map where all families live/from

2. To compare the local area with Africa

 

 

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